Tag: Health


Trust, Tears and Creativity: Our Week in Wisdom

On The Wisdom Daily this week (July 20-24), we discussed how trust is really a two-way street, how walking offers a shortcut to creativity, how compassionate gestures can retain credibility and how gun violence keeps locking our country into paralysis instead of a commitment to problem-solve. Did you grow wiser this week? We hope The Wisdom Daily played a part.   Don’t You Trust Me? – Brad Hirschfield How many times have I – or my wife, or most any parent I know – heard the words, “Don’t you trust me?” from......

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Knowledge Is Power. So How Should We Use It?

Imagine a young couple, happy and bubbling with anticipation over the birth of their first child. Only a few months are left before the big day.?But then, a sonogram reveals an anomaly – maybe in the shape of the skull, or the size of the kidneys. Something isn’t?quite right. Hearing such news is among the most devastating things a parent can experience. Thrown into panic mode, parents hunger for more information, and grasp for something tangible to help them understand what is happening with their child. Will my baby be OK? Will......

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Time to Start Using Ecstasy?

I am a drug user, and I’m not afraid to admit it. In fact, I think if more people could get more comfortable with drug use, a great deal of needless pain and suffering could be avoided. Okay, I’m referring to my occasional use of prescription-strength naproxen for headaches and a statin to lower cholesterol – not marijuana (legal or otherwise), or whatever else you may have thought I meant. To be clear, though, I’ve used opioids, the same stuff that makes heroin all that it is, for weeks at a time......

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Being Ten Percent Happier

Not long ago, Dan Harris, anchor for ABC’s Nightline, published a book about quieting his racing mind through meditation: 10% Happier: How I Tamed the Voice in My Head, Reduced Stress Without Losing My Edge, and Found Self-Help That Actually Works — A True Story. A New York Times nonfiction bestseller (now available in paperback), 10% Happier does have a few ideas, summarized here, that you owe it to yourself to consider – whether you already meditate, have considered trying, or never plan to do so. 1. Don’t necessarily give up grand......

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A Fun Flashback, a Slow Stroll, a Joyful Dad: Our Week in Wisdom

On The Wisdom Daily this week (March 16-20), we discovered a shift in traditional rituals, a film about setting your own pace, a musical trigger for useful memories, a family thrilled to win against cancer, a strategy for chronic complaining, a suggestion for reforming racists and a troubling case of injustice in America. Did you grow wiser this week? We hope The Wisdom Daily played a part.   The Future of Funerals – Brad Hirschfield How we deal with death says a great deal about how we think about life. No surprise,......

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Devon and Leah Still's Thrilling Moment of Victory

I love this photo of NFL star Devon Still and his daughter Leah! How can you not? Both their faces are filled with love and joy, their body language projecting strength and fearlessness. It’s moving on so many levels – and that’s before you factor in their circumstances. Leah was diagnosed last year with stage 4 neuroblastoma. And now, initial testing indicates that the four-year-old has no active cancer in her body. If that isn’t cause for celebration, what is?! You can understand why I – and hundreds of thousands of others......

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Empathy, Cruelty and Extremism: Our Week in Wisdom

On The Wisdom Daily this week (March 9-13), we examined a book about humanizing the innovation process, an app that’s enabling cruelty, a story on parenting while overwhelmed, and a semantics debate around terrorism. Did you grow wiser this week? We hope The Wisdom Daily played a part.   Empathy as a Business Model – Irwin Kula Innovation, innovation, innovation. It’s all we hear today, as we’re flooded with interviews and talks from academic, business and tech-pop culture gurus. The e-book The Technology of Us cuts through the morass. These smart essays,......

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Parents Who Mistrust Vaccines

I found myself quite engaged recently while reading a deeply personal, highly moving piece in the Washington Post, “Why Parents Want to Believe in a Vaccine Conspiracy.” That headline on Susan Senator’s essay drew me in, as it certainly signals that parents averse to immunizations are misguided and even self-deceptive. On the other hand, the author at least engages the error-riddled thinking of those whose views she explains… or is that, explains away? By explaining why people would trust unsubstantiated conspiracy theories as a means to coping with the pain of raising......

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Nuts to All That? Digesting the New Allergy Research

Peanut allergies. Unless you live under a rock, you’ve heard about this. Causing everything from discomfort to death, peanut allergy was barely heard of 20 years ago, yet in America the number of kids who live with this deadly danger has more than quadrupled in the last eight years alone. What is going on here? Well, it turns out that it may be a very big deal, but not in the ways we’re often led to expect: Is it possible the peanut allergy phenomenon might have more to do with parents, and......

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Move Your Body, Free Your Mind

I love when science confirms, and even deepens, the intuition of an ancient practice. A study conducted by Stanford researchers Daniel Schwartz and Marily Opprezzo, reported in the Journal of Experimental Psychology, found that creativity levels were consistently and significantly higher for people when they were walking compared to people who were sitting. In one sample, walking subjects thought of 81 to 100 percent more potential uses for an object than their seated counterparts did. In another sample, people thought of a greater number of linguistic analogies while walking than they did......

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