Tag: Grief


Peace, Hands and Robots: Our Week in Wisdom

On The Wisdom Daily this week (June 8 – 12), we discussed Sheryl Sandberg’s reflections on grieving after sudden loss, technology and robotics continuing to eliminate jobs, hands and the meaningful memories they evoke, an antigay organization’s donation to a progressive philanthropy,?the moneymaking element of peacemaking and the influential preacher upset by a pro-adoption TV ad. Did you grow wiser this week? We hope The Wisdom Daily played a part.   Wisdom on Kids, Music and Loss: Must-Read Links – TWD Whether or not you’ve grieved the loss of someone dear, Lean......

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Wisdom on Kids, Music and Loss: Must-Read Links

As another new week begins, make time for the thought-provoking pieces linked below – from the heartbreaking to the hilarious – with the excerpts that moved us to highlight them here on The Wisdom Daily. Whether or not you’ve grieved the loss of someone dear,?Lean In author Sheryl Sandberg’s writing tops our list because of her universally valuable insights. Whatever’s transpiring in your life, may you find the words of wisdom you need.   1. On the Front Lines of Grief “Real empathy is sometimes not insisting that it will be okay,......

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Baltimore, Tribeca and Nepal: Our Week in Wisdom

On?The Wisdom Daily this week (April 27 – May 1), we talked about kids adjusting their education goals, inadequate relief (and lucrative tourism) in Nepal, award-winning innovations, Iran’s brutal executions and the outrage boiling over in Baltimore. Did you grow wiser this week? We hope The Wisdom Daily played a part.   College Admissions Heartbreak: A Bounce-Back Guide – Irwin Kula Over the past few weeks, I’ve heard from parents about the cruel shock their children experience when rejected from the college of their choice. For many kids, living in privileged environments......

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Mount Everest: Just Because We Can Doesn't Mean We Should

In the aftermath of this weekend’s epic earthquakes in Nepal, the victims and survivors are on my mind. I find myself thinking of Mount Everest and the people killed there. To be sure, with 19 dead and as many as 200 climbers stranded, the recent death and devastation at Mount Everest are comparatively minor when you understand that across Nepal, there may be as many as 10,000 dead, 100,000 injured and a million people in need of water and safe shelter. Of course, human tragedy is not zero-sum. And when it comes......

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The Blessing of Being a Child of Holocaust Survivors

On Thursday, Jews across the world commemorate Yom Hashoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day). For survivors, it is a time to pause and recollect. For Jews everywhere, it is a time to affirm that we will never forget. For me, Yom Hashoah is only an accentuation. I am the son of two Holocaust survivors, the grandchild of another survivor and of three grandparents who did not survive. I commemorate the Holocaust every day. Children of survivors live in dual and occasionally dueling realities. On one hand, we did not ourselves witness the horrors of......

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Anguish About the Germanwings Plane: Where Was God?

From Odyssey Networks’ Faith on the Record series: As horrifying details emerge about the cause of the Germanwings plane crash, an unbearable sense of shared, collective trauma grows. “In a moment of pain, any question has to be safe to ask,” including this one: Where was God? Consider with me how those who lost loved ones may find meaning in the tragedy, in the long hours, days and years of grief that lie ahead for them. Watch my video below for more insight and discussion. Odyssey Networks tells the stories of faith......

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Shock in Chapel Hill: Should We Call It Terrorism?

On Wednesday morning the world woke to the tragic news of the Chapel Hill, N.C., shooting of Deah Shaddy Barakat, 23; Yusor Mohammad, 21; and Razan Mohammad Abu-Salha, 19. A 46-year-old neighbor who turned himself in was subsequently arrested. As of this writing, police are saying the killings may have been related to a dispute over parking spaces, although the father of one of the victims has told reporters that the shooter had harassed them before because of their Muslim faith. My first response to this news is grief. I imagine myself......

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What the World Needs Now Is Empathy

In reading feedback about Brittany Maynard’s physician-assisted suicide, I wondered: How much empathy do we possess, as individuals and as a culture? Do we truly even know what empathy is, and what behavior it requires of us? When Maynard went public with her decision about how and when she would end her life on November 1, 2014, I was immediately transported back to my mother’s last months in 2009. She was faced with the same cancer as Brittany, and after the 11-hour brain surgery, an inserted chemo-wafer into the brain, and a......

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Gratitude The Greatest Medicine?

Substituting for a colleague who leads a grief group, this reflection on coping was shared by someone in the group. Written by Dr. Murray Feingold, it suggests that by focusing on how fortunate we are to have had lost love ones in our lives, we can help ourselves to feel better about the loss. But is that true? For me, the answer is yes… and no.? That response will probably not surprise any TWD readers who have followed my reflections on how I have dealt with my dad’s death, and here is......

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The Illusion That We Suffer Alone

Years ago, during the time that my father was struggling with Alzheimer’s, I happened to catch an interview with the son of Christopher Reeve on television. He was overjoyed that his dad had been able to move his pinkie, a feat he’d not accomplished before. I watched, in awe, as this son described in triumphant detail how amazing it was what his father had done. It put my own pain and struggle into immediate perspective. Thinking about this today reminded me that no matter what kind of burden we may be carrying,......

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