Tag: tolerance


Should a Public School Coach Be Praying With Players?

Which does the U.S. Constitution guarantee – freedom of religion, or freedom from it? The short answer (as with so many constitutional issues) is: It depends. Contextualism and the ongoing ability to interpret the document are two of its greatest strengths, helping assure its durability and relevance. There are settings where an enforced absence of public religious expression is required (bans on prayer in public school classrooms); other situations allow for religious expression, as long as all religious sensibilities are respected (wearing a cross, a yarmulke, a hijab or whatever religious symbols/clothing......

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Let's Talk About Free Speech

From Odyssey Networks’ Faith on the Record series: This week, regents at the University of California-Berkeley declined to enact a proposed policy known as a “Statement of Principles Against Intolerance.” It was a wise move, because the statement itself was an attempt to legislate away what we can only resolve with real relationships and dialogue. Maybe there’s a role for those kinds of rules, about what a person can and can’t say, but we’d all do well to ask, “How will we commit to speaking to each other, about the most divisive......

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The Politically Incorrect Bobblehead

Nathan Hale had only one life to give for his country, but almost 250 years after his death, there’s still plenty of Nathan Hale to go around, and that has upset a Yale-educated author a great deal. Let me explain. As a gift to university supporters, the Yale University class of 1975 recently offered a Nathan Hale bobblehead, a replica of a large bronze statue on the New Haven campus. Like the original, the bobblehead depicts a bound and shackled Hale – who graduated from Yale in 1773 – and is inscribed......

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What It Means for ESPN to Celebrate Caitlyn Jenner

From Odyssey Networks’ Faith on the Record series: ESPN will soon give the Arthur Ashe award to Caitlyn Jenner, causing critics to have a field day on social media. In particular, many think an award for courage is more deserved by an athlete such as young Lauren Hill, who died of brain cancer in April. But awards tell us a lot about who’s giving the award, as much as (if not more than) the recipient. And remember, “ESPN isn’t telling the world the only athlete who’s made a contribution in bravery beyond......

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Freedom of Religion: What Does It Mean?

What does religious freedom mean to you? Is it fundamentally about presence, or absence? Let me explain what I mean. Although countless Americans claim to believe in religious freedom, we clearly don’t share a common understanding of what that principle means – as the ongoing disputes, including legal battles in Indiana and Alabama, from pizza shops to florists, demonstrate. The fact that “religious freedom” is difficult to define is not necessarily a bad thing. When it comes to really big, really important principles, the possibility of multiple interpretations and diverse opinions actually......

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Family, Poetry and Health: Our Week in Wisdom

On The Wisdom Daily this week (April 6-10), we examined the merits of a “good enough” life, a family made extraordinary by loving boys with autism, the art of self-expression through poetry and the spoken word, practical teachings about forgiveness and a new show of leadership regarding American kids’ health and well-being. Did you grow wiser this week? We hope The Wisdom Daily played a part.   Gratitude for ‘Good Enough’ – Michael Bernstein In?the film Whiplash, drum teacher Terrence Fletcher – played by J.K. Simmons – fervently attests that “the two......

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'Normal' Isn't All It's Cracked Up to Be

Here in the U.S., April is National Autism Awareness Month. I’m reminded of a day not very long ago when I found myself googling the word “faith” – as I do from time to time, to see what undiscovered things I might learn or find inspiring – and the following amazing video came up in the results. Faith Jegede Cole is a Washington, D.C., resident (by way of London), who advocates for causes including free speech, civil rights and women’s equality. But what she’s most known for is raising awareness about the......

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Some People Need to 'Stay Weird' to Stay Alive

When I was 16, I tried to kill myself.” As one who lost a beloved relative to suicide almost exactly one year ago to the day, I was moved more than I can say by those words, uttered so gently and so sincerely by The Imitation Game screenwriter Graham Moore as he accepted his Academy Award. Moore’s words touched hearts and minds across the nation, and around the world. How could they not? Coupled with his advice, for anyone who feels so odd or out of place that life seems unlivable, to......

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