Tag: Conflict


This Is Real Courage

I recently wrote about Palestinian professor Mohammed Dajani’s visit to Auschwitz with 27 of his students. On Holocaust Memorial Day 2014, Dajani spoke on “Breaking Holocaust Taboos in Palestinian Society” with some 100 faculty and students of Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School. In his speech, he described how his feelings and ideas evolved from the day when a member of his family received medical treatment at Hadassah Hospital, not as an Arab but simply as a patient and human being. Dajani is the founder and director of Wasatiya, a movement to study and......

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Imagining the Other Side - Learning from a Palestinian Field Trip to Auschwitz

Whatever political views we have on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, it is pretty clear that conventional diplomacy has resulted in all process and little peace. And whatever the desire for peace on either side, for a variety of ideological, political, cultural, historical, and theological reasons, the psychic reward and security that comes from maintaining and “managing” the conflict is for just about everyone greater than the imagined rewards for peace. Perhaps we are at a point where there is so much trauma and such deep mistrust that more than the combatants are creating......

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How Do You Make Peace?

From making peace in our families to resolving the ongoing conflict in the Middle East, making peace often feels like an impossible and unreachable goal. But is it? Just look at this example in the Episcopal church in Virginia – in short, the Truro parish left the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia when a gay leader was elected, “the final straw in a long-running dispute over theological orthodoxy.” Almost all people say they want peace, but how many of us actually feel it is an imperative? This splintering of the church left the......

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Yom Kippur: The Truth About One's Truths

Yom Kippur is the most sacred day in the Jewish calendar. Simply put, it is a day-long exercise in Reality Therapy. For 25 hours or so, the practice is to neither eat nor drink, nor make love, nor enjoy the comforts and conveniences of life – be it a shower or a smart phone – but to reflect and contemplate our mortality, to feel deeply there is no guarantee that we (or anyone in our life) will even be here tomorrow, to be on our deathbed but be fully conscious. Have you......

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