Tag: Philosophy


Wisdom on Timing, Labels and More: Must-Read Links

Welcome to a new week on The Wisdom Daily. Dive into some of the most fascinating reads (quoted here) that we’ve spotted elsewhere – including insightful perspectives on what constitutes a miracle, how much siblings shape our personality, where modern-day philosophy is thriving, why boredom helps enrich our lives and more. Whatever’s transpiring in your life, may you find the words of wisdom you need.   1. Once Upon a Tablet “I travel all the time. I’m on a plane almost every week. I carry a library with me on my tablet.......

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The Crazy Rituals of Creative People

Did you know that Benjamin Franklin started his day with an “air bath” – which means he sat around naked? And that Thomas Wolfe wrote while standing up in the kitchen, utilizing the top of the refrigerator as his desk, fondling his “male configurations”? Jean-Paul Sartre chewed on enough tablets to meet ten times the recommended daily dosage of Corydrane (a mix of amphetamine and aspirin). The painter Georgia O’Keefe rose early to drink tea alone in bed and watch the sun rise before entering her studio. And the writer Honore de......

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Recommended Reading - Faith and the Digital Age

Need a new stack of books for your bedside table? Brad and Irwin share their reading list and insights gleaned from within the pages. Let us know your thoughts on the books if you’ve read them (or leave book recommendations) in the comments below.   1. The Soul of the World Bob Dylan sang, “It may be the devil or it may be the Lord, but you’re gonna have to serve somebody.” English philosopher and writer Roger Scruton’s wise and beautifully written The Soul of the World (Princeton University Press) makes the......

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The Spirit's Irrepressible Impulse

In the words of Bob Dylan, “It may be the devil, or it may be the Lord, but you’re gonna have to serve somebody.” English philosopher Roger Scruton’s wise and beautifully written The Soul of the World makes the case that, despite the brashness of the New Atheists and the increase of “Nones” (those with no religious affiliation) there is a “fundamentally religious impulse” – what we call “the sacred” – that is irrepressible. Scruton explains faith as an “attitude of openness to meanings” (experienced in love, art, nature and morality) that......

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